Consider prepaying next years Private Health Insurance before June 30th – EOFY Money Saving TIP #1


As a result of the introduction of mean testing of the Private Health Insurance Premium Rebate wewant to alert you to a one-off savings possibility in relation to the private health insurance rebate.

If you pre-pay your 2012/13 private health insurance premium before 30 June 2012, you may still be able to access the Government rebate.

As you may be aware, the Government currently provides a non-means tested rebate for private health insurance premiums. The rebate can be claimed directly from the insurer, or as a tax offset when you lodge your income tax return. the majority of clients claim it upfront and if you don’t then you may need to consider doing so this year.

The rebate is currently 30% for those under 65 and rising  from 35% to 40% of the premium depending on the age of the policy holder.

The Government has now passed the required legislation that will apply an income test to the availability of the rebate to any premiums paid on or after 1 July 2012. The more income you earn, the lower the rebate as follows:

Private Health Insurance Incentive Tiers (2011-2012) with effect 1 July 2012

Singles

<$84,000 

$84,001-97,000

$97,001-130,000

>$130,001

Families

<$168,000

$168,001-194,000

$194,001-260,000

>$260,001

Rebate
< age 65 30% 20% 10% 0%
Age 65-69 35% 25% 15% 0%
Age 70+ 40% 30% 20% 0%
Medicare Levy Surcharge
All ages 0.0% 1.0% 1.25% 1.5%

Note: The thresholds increase annually, based on growth in Average Weekly Ordinary Time Earnings (AWOTE). Single parents and couples (including de facto couples) are subject to the family tiers. For families with children, the thresholds are increased by $1,500 for each child after the first.

Singles earning $84,000 or less and families earning $168,000 or less will continue to receive the existing 30, 35 and 40 per cent rebate, depending on their age.

Once your ‘adjusted’ income is greater than $130,000 (or $260,000 as a family), no rebate will be available.

For a family with gross premiums of say $2,500, this will result in an increase to the out of pocket premium costs of $750.00

The current rebate applies to a premium ‘paid’ during the income year. Accordingly, it follows that if you prepay your 2012-13 premium on or before 30 June 2012, the current rules should apply and the rebate should be available.

If you are interested in this one-off savings opportunity, we suggest you contact your private health insurer to discuss the possibility of pre-paying next year’s premium and ensure that their is no penalty for prepayment and that their system can cope with the prepayment.

Increase to Medicare Surcharge levy for High Income Earners

For those without Private Health Cover be aware that  the Medicare levy surcharge for people without private health insurance will lift to 1.5 per cent of taxable income for those top earners without private health insurance cover. (see table above)

I hope this guidance  has been helpful and please take the time to comment. Feedback always appreciated.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AdvDipFS AMC

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

      

NextGen Wealth Solutions

Tel: 02 8853 6833,  Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

 

ABN 20 060 778 216 • AFSL No.232686

Liam Shorte is a partner in NextGen Wealth Solutions, Corporate Authorised Representative of Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited, Licence No 232686, Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited ABN 20 060 778 216.

Important information

The information in this article is provided for illustrative purposes only and does not take into consideration your personal circumstances. You are encouraged to seek financial advice suitable to your circumstances to avoid a decision that is not appropriate. Any reference to your actual circumstances is coincidental. Genesys and its representatives receive fees and brokerage from the provision of financial advice or placement of financial products.

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