Government bonds arrive for retail investors but may not jump out of the gate


Legislation passed through parliament yesterday that followed through on a promise by “the world’s greatest treasurer” Wayne Swan that Government bonds will be listed for the retail market (I nearly said the ASX but now we have to be generic as we have Chi-X as well). the Treasurer took his time getting the legislation together but now we have it in place.

Click the link below to read more of this article

http://www.smh.com.au/business/government-bonds-set-to-fail-with-retail-investors-20121102-28nqj.html

Are you looking for an advisor that will keep you up to date and provide guidance and tips like in this blog? Then why now contact me at our Castle Hill or Windsor office in Northwest Sydney to arrange a one on one consultation. Just click the Schedule Now button up on the left to find the appointment options.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser 

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin NextGen Wealth on Facebook   

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

Are SMSF Investors really comparing Hybrids vs. Company Shares?


 

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Every article I  read at the moment the commentators are more and more sceptical about the recent issues of Australian listed hybrids and notes. They constantly compare the hybrid against the equity in the actual shares of the issuer.

And yes I have been saying to younger clients who wanted to invest that I personally would buy the shares of the blue chip issuers, not the hybrid, because the successful hybrid issue shifts risk from equity investors to the hybrid investors and if you are going to take long-term risk then get recompensed for it from the  issuer.

Yet the majority of people buying these hybrids are not my younger clients and they probably don’t look at the case for hybrids vs. shares. They are my SMSF Retiree and Pre Retiree clients. They look at the investment case of hybrids vs. their HISA (High Interest Savings Accounts) rates and term deposit rates. I know from these clients the majority of the demand for Australian hybrids has come from maturing term deposits and falling interest rates as the RBA cuts.

The banks and their advisers have worked out these “yield plays” seem to be in favour and hybrid issuance is increasing as term deposit and cash rates fall. They are tempting clients to put some of their “defensive portfolio” in to this sector rather than trying to grab some of the Share portfolio allocation.

Commentators say that the banks who are the main issuers are getting the best deal and yes their ratings have been improving when they finalise these issues.

They recommend that you buy the Shares in these companies rather than the “mutton dressed up as lamb” hybrids.

Christopher Joye in the SMH provided the following as an example where he compared the results using CBA PERLS IV vs. CBA Shares themselves over the period July 2007 to July 2012. Yes, with hindsight, you would be far better off owning the shares but they miss the point. Regardless of the outcome many SMSF trustees have a lower risk tolerance and they would be content with the returns from the PERLS IV (25.4% over 5 tumultuous years) during that period while they may have had a meltdown if in the CBA shares during the highlighted volatile period July 07-Mar ’09.

The other point I should make is that clients are making much smaller risk adjusted plays in these hybrids by quality issuers only and are willing to hold to maturity. When they have  a $100K Term Deposit maturing they are placing 10K-30K in to one or two of these hybrids and putting the rest back on Term Deposits. It is recognition that these hybrids do carry more risk and that they understand that risk.

Their aim is not to attain equity like returns but an average portfolio income in the 5.5-6% mark and that can no longer be achieved by cash and TDs alone. So yes they are taking on more risk to achieve their objectives but they are not being silly and getting over exposed. That is why we have avoided Crown, Caltex, Bendigo & Adelaide and even SunCorp issuances.

So yes the Banks get the benefit of cheaper finance but SMSF investors get access to that yield, in bite sized manageable chunks that they require with less volatility than the underlying share. The risks in hybrids are not to be scoffed at but if you do your home work, understand the risk, keep the allocations small and think long term, then they may have a place in your portfolio.

If you want to read more about hybrids generally, the ASX has produced a guide – Understanding hybrid securities – that you can download here.

Are you looking for an advisor that will keep you up to date and provide guidance and tips like in this blog? Then why now contact me at our Castle Hill or Windsor office in Northwest Sydney to arrange a one on one consultation. Just click the Schedule Now button up on the left to find the appointment options.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser 

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin NextGen Wealth on Facebook   

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

2 Hits to Retirees On The Cards – Term Deposit Rates down & Swanny On The Pillage


Danger to Retirement IncomeWait until you see the news reports this week talking about how great it is for mortgage holders and first home buyers rejoicing at the drop in interest rates by the RBA on Tuesday. In reality only 1/3 of the population has a mortgage but they get the headlines.

However the self-funded retiree or those in pre-retirement looking to save for a decent income in retirement will not be rejoicing as they have to get used to a 4 in front of their Term Deposit rates and worry about the possibility of a 3 within 12 months. These are the people who often don’t have the ability to work a little extra overtime or take on part-time job to supplement their income as older workers aren’t exactly swamped with employment offers.

It may be time to bite the bullet and lock some of your funds in for 2-5 years for the best rate you can get as anything around the 5% mark is looking very attractive and not a big risk in terms of exposure to rising rates as the USA has guaranteed they will keep their rates at or near 0% until 2015. I can’t see Australia getting to far out of step with them in the coming years and it is more likely we will have to lower rates further to weaken our dollar for the economy’s sake.

Other governments are buying our Dollar to invest in what they consider stable Australian Government Bonds and Companies. A blog by my friends at Macro Business lists new countries targeting Aussie assets as reported by various media including the AFR is scary including:

Czech Republic, Kazakhstan, Switzerland, Brazil, Poland, Hong Kong Vietnam, Abu Dhabi, Kuwait,  Qatar , South Korea and of course China with possibly Peru, Malaysia and Singapore as well. All their interest means demand for our currency rises and the exchange rate goes up which the RBA has to try to manage through Interest rate strategies. All that does not bode well for your average Aussie SMSF investor seeking yield or in more simple terms income.

So time to either load up with the best long-term interest rate you can get risk free or prepare to re-enter or increase your exposure to the share market and other sources of income. Be careful chasing yield and understand the risk of any investment paying more than 1-2% above the RBA’s 3.25%.

The second possible hit is harder for me to discuss as I tend to be apolitical in my views under normal circumstances but I feel I have to say something as the leaks to the media in the last few weeks seem to be softening up the SMSF sector for some hard hits.

So on top of the interest rate cuts to your income  we have a Treasurer likely to just compound the problem because in his desperation not to give the Liberals ammunition to throw at him over budget deficits appears willing to destroy the confidence in the Australian Superannuation system by dipping his hands in to the “honey pot” that is the retirement savings of everyday Australians. He is being goaded on by the unions and industry fund sector who control a massive position of the retirement pot but mostly those with insufficient savings to fund their retirement. They seem hell-bent on making sure NO ONE can afford a comfortable retirement and all will depend on an Age Pension to some degree. They have Self Managed Super Funds (SMSF) in their sights! It may be more layers of compliance fees or reduction in tax concessions or some similar theft of your savings by stealth but we know something is coming so better to be prepared.

I urge all SMSF investors and self funded retirees in general to get on the front foot before the Half Year Budget update and be prepared to speak up to your local member of parliament and write tot he press now rather than later to try to stop this government pillaging your savings to fund a  meaningless surplus. If the opposition took the pressure off the need to bring in a surplus that would help too but I know I am dreaming with that idea. The short-term gain of accessing funding from our Superannuation will lead to a huge drop in confidence in a system that has already been hammered in the last few years by Government changes and the CFC.

For further information on the issues raised in this blog please contact our Castle Hill SMSF Centre or Windsor Financial Planning Office.

Are you looking for an advisor that will keep you up to date and provide guidance and tips like in this blog? Then why now contact me at our Castle Hill or Windsor office in Northwest Sydney to arrange a one on one consultation. Just click the Schedule Now button up on the left to find the appointment options.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser 

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin NextGen Wealth on Facebook   

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

What can my SMSF invest in?


Control over investment decisions lies with the Trustees of the Fund.

We find this is the main reason so many Australians are establishing their own Self-Managed Superannuation Fund or SMSF for short. The range of investments you can consider for your portfolio include almost anything you yourself could invest in as an individual including:

  • Direct investments  (such as shares, ETFs, cash, term deposits, hybrids, income securities, gold/silver bullion and bonds)
  • Direct property (Residential houses, villas, units, as well as Commercial property such as offices, warehouses, factory units, shops and land.)
  • Managed funds (retail or wholesale, domestic and/or international)
  • Private Unit Trusts
  • A business (non-related party to avoid hassle) and business property
  • Non-traditional assets such as coins, antiques, art , taxi plate licences, ATMs

The first step is to ensure your Trust Deed allows you to invest in the items you are considering. I know it is a long boring document but you need to know its contents so go through it regularly to get a handle on it.

Once satisfied the Trust deed does not exclude an investment, the types of investments the SMSF actually holds are determined by the fund’s investment strategy, which is formulated by you, along with the other members in the fund, and often advised by an SMSF Specialist Advisor™. The fund’s strategy should reflect your objectives, risk profile/tolerance, liquidity needs and the investments you intend to utilise. This is not set and forget or forged in stone. The investment strategy can be changed as often as you wish, to suit your changing circumstances and to take advantage of new investment opportunities. The fund can also incorporate different strategies to suit each of its members.

An important benefit of this having this ultimate control is that, during retirement phase, you can continue to invest in growth assets. This contrasts the approach of many retail providers, who lock ‘pension phase’ investors into income-producing assets such as cash and fixed interest, increasing the risk that the investor may outlive their retirement savings. This is coming back on the agenda now as many funds move to ”Lifecycle strategies” which I believe are dangerous in assuming that fixed interest is low risk when inflation is a real risk and bubbles can effect the capital value of even “conservative”options.

It is important to understand that there are certain regulatory limitations placed on SMSF; for example, a fund cannot borrow money to invest in assets such as property or shares unless the funds are provided through a Limited Recourse Borrowing Arrangement (LRBA) .

A fund cannot acquire assets from related parties of the fund or invest in in-house assets; for example the fund could not purchase your assets (such as your house or residential investment property) from you. Other restrictions placed on the fund include the inability to lend funds to members or their relatives or to provide the assets of the fund as security for personal borrowing.

As part of our service, we can provide you with access to a range of investments for your SMSF.

Can I invest in equipment and leased it to my business?

Technically yes but there are so many ways you can get in trouble it may not be worth the hassle. I went into this in more debt in this article.

Can I buy a Classic or Vintage Car within my SMSF?

Again technically and theoretically yes you can, but it would be very difficult with many pitfalls. You’d also have to be able to prove to the ATO that the investment meeting the sole purpose test and was going to generate income for your retirement and not for personal enjoyment now! You can own but you or a related party cannot drive it even for maintenance purposes! If you invest in classic cars, they would have to be hired out to generate income. It would be difficult for you to drive. Remember if you are driving you need to be covered by the vehicle’s insurance, and that would make it obvious to the ATO you are using the car for your own purposes.

Can I use a property within my SMSF?

SMSFs are expressly forbidden from investing in the family home or holiday home for your personal use. But they are able to invest in investment properties – as long as the property is only used for investment purposes. Likewise properties within holiday resorts or golf courses can draw the ire of the ATO as again you may be seen to benefitting members personally rather than providing for retirement

This means fund members can’t go and stay in the property or rent it out to family members. The property should generally be managed by a real estate agent to satisfy the sole purpose test regulations unless you can show genuine evidence that you are managing it professionally yourself.

If I want to push the limits! Coins, jewellery, antiques, wine and art?

You can invest in coins – but you can’t display them if you want to satisfy the sole purpose test. Coins are collectables if their value exceeds their face value. Therefore, if bullion coins have a value that exceeds their face value and they are traded at a price above the spot price of their metal content, they will be a collectable and your SMSF must comply with regulation 13.18AA in relation to the investment

Likewise, you can invest in wine but you can’t drink it unless you are in pension fully retired and taking it out as a lump sum pension payment! If your fund acquired the wine on or after 1 July 2011 it must not be stored in the private residence of any related party. A private residence includes all parts of a private dwelling (above or below ground), the land on which the private residence is situated and all other buildings on that land, such as garages or sheds.

SMSF investments in art operate in a similar way. You can’t hang it in the hall at home, but you can rent it to a non-related company or an art bank that rents out artworks on an ongoing basis.

Here is a link to the ATO’s guidance on leasing and selling artworks:

Although it might seem like a good idea to use your super to invest in exotic assets, the value of these types of investments is notoriously volatile and the market for these asset classes is generally pretty illiquid. If you have special or professional knowledge in a particular subject then you may be able to put forward a better case than an ordinary person for engaging in those assets as part of your funds strategy. Again make sure that you are not using your SMSF or its assets to prop up your own business.

I hope these thoughts  have been helpful and please take the time to comment if you know of other investments as I know this is not an exhaustive list. Would love some feedback as well.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser 

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin NextGen Wealth on Facebook   

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

Understanding transition to retirement pensions


If you have reached your preservation age you can use a transition to retirement pension to access your superannuation as a non-commutable income stream while you are still working. This may be particularly attractive if you have reduced your working hours and need to top-up your income to maintain your standard of living.

There was another great benefit of setting up the pension which was that all the funds supporting the pension move in to a tax exempt status. Yes that means those funds paid no earnings tax and in fact they received a full refund of any franking credits on your investments. For the average investor this can increase your returns by 0.5% to 1% a year risk free every year! However that tax free status will be removed as of 1 July 2017.

The strategy still remains effective for those needing a boost in income or those who can combine the pension with salary sacrifice.

What is a transition to retirement pension?

Transition to retirement pensions allow you to access your superannuation as a non-commutable income stream, after reaching preservation age (see below), but while you are still working.

The aim of these income streams is to provide you with flexibility in the lead up to retirement. For example, you may choose to reduce your working hours and at the same time access your superannuation as a transition to retirement pension that can supplement your other income. It may also allow you to salary sacrifice to give your retirement savings a boost.

Not all superannuation funds offer the transition to retirement pensions, so you need to check with your own fund to see if they do. You can also start one in a self-managed superannuation fund.

Are there any special characteristics?

These pensions are essentially like a normal account-based pension, but with two important differences.

Firstly, they are non-commutable, which means they cannot be converted into a lump sum until you satisfy a condition of release, such as retirement or age 65.

Secondly, you have a minimum pension amount you must withdraw each year but you can only withdraw up to 10% of the account balance (at 1 July). No lump sum withdrawals are allowed.

What is my preservation age?

Your preservation age is generally the date from which you can access your superannuation benefits and depends upon your date of birth.

Date of birth Preservation Age
Before 1 July 1960 55
1 July 1960 – 30 June 1961 56
1 July 1961 – 30 June 1962 57
1 July 1962 – 30 June 1963 58
1 July 1963 – 30 June 1964 59
After 30 June 1964 60

How are transition to retirement pensions taxed?

Transition to retirement pensions are taxed the same as regular superannuation income streams.

If you are under age 60, the taxable part of your pension will be taxed at your marginal rate, but you receive a 15% tax offset if your pension is paid from a taxed source*.

However, once you reach 60, your pension is tax-free if paid from a taxed source*.

  • Most people belong to a taxed superannuation fund. Some government superannuation funds may be untaxed and you will pay higher tax on pensions.

Can you still contribute to superannuation?

As long as you are eligible to contribute, you and your employer can still contribute to superannuation for your benefit. In any case, your employer’s usual superannuation guarantee obligations would still apply. You need to have an accumulation account to pay these amounts into.

Is a transition to retirement pension right for you?

Transition to retirement pensions can provide you with flexibility in the years leading up to your retirement and can help to boost your retirement savings in some circumstances.

People who might find the transition to retirement pensions attractive include those who:

  • have reduced working hours from full-time to part-time, eg down to three days per week. The reduced salary can be topped up with income from the transition to retirement pension
  • are able to salary sacrifice to superannuation – the outcome of combining the transition to retirement pension with salary sacrifice can be a greater build-up of superannuation savings by the time you reach actual retirement

The transition to retirement rules and associated strategies can be very complicated. It is recommended that you seek expert advice from your financial adviser before deciding if this type of income stream and strategy is right for you.

Want a Superannuation Review or are you just looking for an adviser that will keep you up to date and provide guidance and tips like in this blog? Then why now contact me at our Castle Hill or Windsor office in Northwest Sydney to arrange a one on one consultation. Just click the Schedule Now button up on the left to find the appointment options. Do it! make 2016 the year to get organised or it will be 2026 before you know it.

Please consider passing on this article to family or friends. Pay it forward!

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser 

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin NextGen Wealth on Facebook   

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

Managing the Government Guarantee on Term Deposits as an SMSF Trustee


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SMSF trustees are able to take advantage of cash accounts backed by the Federal Government’s Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), commonly known as the government guarantee, to improve the security of their capital and achieve good levels of interest.

In 2012 the Government announced the guarantee on deposits was to be reduced to a $250,000 cap, down from $1m cap in place since 2008. The lower limit is a concern to many SMSF Trustees given that it reduces competitiveness between the Big 4 banks and smaller the regional banks and the building societies.

The initial reaction especially for the risk averse was for Term Deposits larger than the cap to drift back to the CBA, ANZ, Westpac and NAB, given their much higher credit ratings. They have capitalised on the move and as a consequence we see lower term deposit rates from the Big 4 for amounts more than $250,000 since February 2012.

So what strategies are available to retain the government guarantee and to secure the higher interest rates.  Here are some ideas for the SMSF Trustees and Self funded Retirees to consider:

  1. Do your research on your target providers and consider if the guarantee is really needed. If you are willing to take the risk on the solid backing of many of Australia’s financial institutions. If you are happy with them then you may just opt for the highest interest rate paying one and don’t be afraid to ask them to get you a better deal than advertised as you can get 0.05 to 0.2% by asking! It all adds to your bottom line so don’t be shy.
  2. If you have more than $250,000 to invest, you could split your investment between a number of providers. At www.ratecity.com.au and www.mozo.com.au  they give you details of a number of different institutions such as ING DIRECT, ME Bank, Greater Building Society and Rabobank. Don’t be afraid of these names not being too familiar, they have the guarantee! You could split deposits across 3-4 institutions as well as your current Big 4 favourite and maintain the guarantee on your portfolio.  It does involve a bit of work to set up initially but if you’re wanting a government guarantee, then it’s worth the initial effort, think of it as an Insurance policy application!
  3. The added benefit is that should you need access to some funds urgently then you may only have to break one of the Term Deposits instead of previously breaking the one large one and incurring Break Fee, which we all hate. You may stagger the terms to ensure even more flexibility.
  4. Now you may not be comfortable with this one as the level of knowledge about this sector is not great among individual trustees but you might consider buying some bonds for a higher return. By investing lower in the capital structure in those well-known banks where you are confident that they will continue to trade, you can pick up a higher return. While senior bonds are higher risk than term deposits, the main benefit they have is that they are liquid and can be sold very quickly.
  5. Yields on Australian dollar bonds are not great at the moment as market expectations for a low growth world economy spreads with the IMF this week reducing forecasts even further. Your adviser or fixed interest broker can guide you towards the better risk and decent yielding bonds and you can expect 2.5 to 5.5% for what I would consider suitable risk for a moderately conservative investor if well diversified.
  6. Don’t chase a guarantee or safety to far and limit exposure to underpaying securities like the 10-year government bond, 2.58 per cent. For $50,000, some of the best-paying, three-year term deposits with the deposit guarantee are paying in excess of 3.2 per cent.
  7. If you want diversity without the extra paperwork think about outsourcing this sector to a professional fund manager like Macquarie Income Opportunities Fund. Schroders or Henderson also have decent offerings in this conservative end of the sector. Look for a mindset in a Fund Manager that sees Capital Preservation as a core to their strategy.
  8. Instead of lending to the bank, buy the bank or at least blue chip shares that provide decent dividends. Buy no more than a handful of reliable blue-chip stocks that pay a regular dividend and are forecast to continue to do so through thick and thin. These should be “bottom drawer” stocks. If you have only got a small part of your wealth invested in them then you can afford to let them ride the volatility but you still need to watch their sector for any major changes (think Blockbuster video demise after online streaming). I am talking about the 1 or 2 banks, the consumer staples like Wesfarmers and inflation linked income companies like APA Group which owns Australia’s largest natural gas distribution and storage infrastructure network, constituting mainly gas transmission and distribution, mostly servicing power generation, industrial, and commercial customers.

All to0 hard? Well at Verante Financial Planning we have access to a facility that can access over 20 Term Deposit providers in one place with a one-off application form and easy transfer from institution to institution at maturity for the best rates.Have a look at Australian Money Market

In summary it appears most people are unsure about the future and want guarantees on their investments while on the other side younger people don’t want to take on additional debt at this time. This means we’re likely to see rates remain low for some time. By doing some research and comparing what’s available in the market and maybe seeking advice for a second opinion you can find the Term Deposit that suits your needs.

Are you looking for an advisor that will keep you up to date and provide guidance and tips like in this blog? Then why now contact me at our Castle Hill or Windsor office in Northwest Sydney to arrange a one on one consultation. Just click the Schedule Now button up on the left to find the appointment options.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser 

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin NextGen Wealth on Facebook   

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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