Advertisements
Advertisements

Retirement Planning Tips for 2017 onwards


ID-100407988

Retirement planning is vitally important and with the new rules it may be more important to start as early as possible. New limitations on contributions to super will mean you must be actively making additional contributions sooner. Then when you have been working hard to get money into the super environment, and have complied with all the rules and contribution caps, you want to ensure you are maximising your opportunities when you start to draw on your super savings for a retirement income stream.

What are the changes?

  • A maximum limit of $1.6 million is permitted to be transferred into retirement income stream products.
  • Excessive balances can remain in super in accumulation phase
  • Earnings on assets supporting transition to retirement income streams will be taxed within super

Limits on amounts that can be transferred into retirement income streams

There has been considerable talk in recent times about whether a limit should be placed on the amount that can be accumulated within super and afforded tax concessions. Rather than simply place an arbitrary ceiling on how much can be held inside super, the Government has instead targeted potentially excessive superannuation balances by limiting the amount that will be eligible for the nil tax on earnings concession. From 1 July 2017, the maximum amount that can be placed into retirement income streams will be $1.6 million. For anyone who has started income streams and account balances exceeding that limit, there will be a requirement to roll-back (or withdraw) amounts to bring them in line with these new maximums. The current tax free status of earnings on assets supporting superannuation income streams will only be available to the extent that the income streams are within this new limit.

Excessive balances can remain in superannuation

There is a lot of media hype and some misconceptions floating around at present. It’s important you understand that if you are in the fortunate position to have more than $1.6 million in super, you aren’t forced to withdraw the additional benefits. Amounts above the $1.6 million threshold can remain in super, but must remain in the accumulation phase. Earnings will be taxed at the standard superannuation tax rate of 15% which for many people will be better than paying their marginal tax rate on the earnings if they take the funds out of the system.

Also remember if you have $1.6m in pension then if you take the excess funds out of your SMSF then you will not have an opportunity to put the funds back in as you will be blocked form making further non-concessional (after tax) contributions.

For some, it may be worthwhile to explore taking some of the excess out in to your own names after July 2017 if you have a low level of assets outside in your personal names or through family trusts. But remember if you’re minimum pensions from  the remaining money in superannuation pensions is more than you need to live on then these funds can build up quickly outside of the system and you could be come taxable now or when the first spouse passes.

Earnings on assets supporting transition to retirement income streams will be taxed within super

Despite considerable speculation, the Government has not removed the ability to commence and run transition to retirement (TTR) income streams. TTR income streams are available to you once you reach your preservation age. They allow you to access your super in the form of an income stream without the need to retire or alter your employment arrangements. However, the Government has opted to reduce the concessions available for these income streams. From 1 July 2017, instead of earnings on assets supporting these income streams being exempt from tax within the super environment (as would apply to all other income streams within the new $1.6 million threshold), earnings will instead remain subject to the standard 15% tax rate that applies to funds in accumulation phase.

So for those accessing their super via a TTR so they can salary sacrifice more of their wages back to super within the new $25,000 limit from 1 July 2017, then this is still a very valid strategy. How ever if you have the savings and can manage without accessing your super balance then it may be better to move your fund to accumulation phase.

Look for opportunities to change from a transition to retirement income streams to a full account based pension

If you retire before 60 or leave any one employer after age 60 then you can switch your TTR to a full tax free pension. So think about your situation and do you or can you do marking of exams, AEC electoral role work, stocktaking, Christmas short term employment, part-time survey work, bar work, filling in for family in a business while they go on holidays. If you can document a work arrangement and it genuinely ceases then you can meet that further condition of release which could move your fund in to tax free earnings phase again.

Summary

What hasn’t changed is the tax treatment of superannuation benefits received by individuals from their retirement savings. Payments received after reaching age 60 will continue to be received tax free. To ensure you get the right advice for your situation give us a call on 02 9984 1844 or click here to schedule an appointment

We have offices in Castle Hill and Windsor but can meet clients anywhere in Sydney or via Skype.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser 

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin NextGen Wealth on Facebook   

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

 

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Reminder: Minimum annual payments for Superannuation Income Streams in 2014 / 15 including SMSF Pensions.


Yes the Government have been messing about with the system so much over the last few years that many clients have been totally confused and had to confirm their minimum pension payments for last year so I thought I would just remind everyone of this years limits so they can put their payment plans in place.

How much to take to stay compliant with your pension

How much to take to stay compliant with your pension

If you started a pension or annuity on or after 1 July 2007, a minimum pension amount is required to be paid each year. There is no maximum amount other than the balance of your super account, unless it is a transition to retirement pension in which case the maximum amount is 10% of the account balance.

The minimum payment amounts will not be reduced for the  2014-15 year. The following table shows the minimum percentage factor (indicative only) for each age group.

Age

Minimum % withdrawal (2014-15)

Under 65

4%

65-74

5%

75-79

6%

80-84

7%

85-89

9%

90-94

11%

95 or more

14%

Note that these withdrawal factors are indicative only. To determine the precise minimum annual payment (especially for market linked income streams), see the pro-rating, rounding and other rules in the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Regulations 1994.

For rules and limits on other Payments from super here are the relevant links to the ATO site.

Low rate cap amount

Untaxed plan cap amount

Minimum annual payments for super income streams

Preservation age

Super lump sum tax table

Super income stream tax tables

Are you looking for an advisor that will keep you up to date and provide guidance and tips like in this blog? Then why not contact me at our Castle Hill or Windsor office in Northwest Sydney to arrange a one on one consultation. Just click the Schedule Now button up on the left to find the appointment options. Please reblog, retweet, put on your Facebook page if you found information helpful.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter  Liam Shorte on Linkedin  NextGen Wealth on Facebook 

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 8853 6833,  Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St, Castle Hill NSW 2154

308 George St, Windsor NSW 2756

 

ABN 20 060 778 216 • AFSL No.232686

Liam Shorte is a partner in Verante Financial Planning, Corporate Authorised Representative of Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited, Licence No 232686, Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited ABN 20 060 778 216.

Important information :

The information in this article is provided for illustrative purposes only and does not take into consideration your personal circumstances. You are encouraged to seek financial advice suitable to your circumstances to avoid a decision that is not appropriate. Any reference to your actual circumstances is coincidental. Genesys and its representatives receive fees and brokerage from the provision of financial advice or placement of financial products.

New changes to Superannuation in summary for SMSF Trustees


Firstly nothing to scary but some stings in the tail.    Tax Reform

Mr Swan and Superannuation Minister Bill Shorten fronted announced a tax exemption on superannuation earnings supporting pensions and annuities will be capped at $100,000, and anything above that level taxed at a rate of 15 per cent from 01/07/2014.

Based on a 5% earnings rate that would only impact on those with super assets of more than $2 million. Remember this is per account so for a couple each of them could have $2,000,000 without paying tax on their pension

The $100,000 threshold will be indexed to the Consumer Price Index (CPI), and will increase in $10,000 increments.

Special Treatment for Capital gains on Assets purchased before 01/07/2014 ( Did not proceed)

-  For existing assets (such as property or shares) that were purchased before 5 April 2013, the reform will only apply to capital gains that accrue after 1 July 2024;

-  For new assets that are purchased from 5 April 2013 to 30 June 2014, individuals will have the choice of applying the reform to the entire capital gain, or only that part that accrues after 1 July 2014; and

-  For new assets that are purchased after 1 July 2014, the new limits will apply to the entire capital gain.

Higher concessional cap for people aged 60 and over brought forward

Accordingly, the government will bring forward the start date for the new higher concessional cap of $35,000  to July 1 for people aged 60 and over. Concessional includes employer SGC (9-12%) and Salary Sacrifice.

Individuals aged 50 and over will be able to access the higher concessional cap of $35,000 from the current planned start date of 1 July 2014.

The general concessional cap is expected to reach $35,000 from 1 July 2018 for those under 50.

Excess contributions tax to be reformed

Mr Shorten said the government will reform the system of excess contributions tax (ECT) that was introduced by the former government in 2007, to make it fairer and give individuals greater choice.

Under the current arrangements, concessional contributions that are in excess of the annual cap are effectively taxed at the top marginal tax rate (46.5 per cent) rather than the normal rate of 15 per cent.

Now you will pay tax on the excess contribution to match what you would have paid at your marginal tax rate. for example if you are on the 37% tax bracket you would pay ECT at 22% rather than 30% if you had to pay it on the top marginal rate of 45% (plus Medicare).

Income Streams will be Deemed like non-superannuation assets

Under the change announced today, standard pension deeming arrangements will apply to new superannuation account-based income streams assessed under the pension income test rules after 1 January 2015.

Instead of the concessional treatment of Account Based Pensions currently for those accessing an Aged Pension, they will be deemed like normal assets. This will affect those on the borderline of $55K income for a single person and $80K for a couple who previously benefited from deductible amounts on their account based or allocated pensions.

Extending concessional tax treatment to deferred lifetime annuities

The Government will encourage the take-up of deferred lifetime annuities (DLAs), by providing these products with the same concessional tax treatment that superannuation assets supporting income streams receive. This reform will apply from 1 July 2014.

Mr Swan also announced the Gillard government will establish a Council of Superannuation Custodians to ensure that any future changes are consistent with an agreed Charter of Superannuation Adequacy and Sustainability.

Here is the link to the full press release “A fairer superannuation system”

As always please contact me if you want to look at your own particular situation and we will break it down in plain English for you. We have offices in Castle Hill and Windsor but can meet clients anywhere in Sydney or online via Skype.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AdvDipFS

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

 Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter  Liam Shorte on Linkedin  NextGen Wealth on Facebook 

NextGen Wealth Solutions

Tel: 02 8853 6833,  Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

 

ABN 20 060 778 216 • AFSL No.232686

Liam Shorte is a partner in NextGen Wealth Solutions, Corporate Authorised Representative of Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited, Licence No 232686, Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited ABN 20 060 778 216.

Important information :

The information in this article is provided for illustrative purposes only and does not take into consideration your personal circumstances. You are encouraged to seek financial advice suitable to your circumstances to avoid a decision that is not appropriate. Any reference to your actual circumstances is coincidental. Genesys and its representatives receive fees and brokerage from the provision of financial advice or placement of financial products.

What happens if I don’t take the minimum pension?


The Australian Tax Office (ATO) in January 2013 released guidance on the consequences of trustees not paying minimum amounts from account based pensions, including the loss of tax exempt status. It has issued two documents on starting and stopping a superannuation income stream (pensions) for self-managed superannuation funds. Tax Free

 (more…)

ATO backs off on SMSF property crunch | | MacroBusiness


In November 2011, a draft tax ruling (TR2011/D3) by the ATO caused concern among Self Managed Superannuation Fund trustees and property investors in particular. The ruling suggested that the pension tax exemption …

See the full article on www.macrobusiness.com.au

Superannuation — tax certainty for deceased estates – Government MYEFO announcement good for SMSFs


The release of draft taxation ruling TR 2011/D3 in July last year caused much concern when it suggested that the pension exemption ceases automatically upon death (unless a reversionary pension was in place).

Under those proposed rules if an SMSF member died with assets carrying unrealised Capital Gains, even if the deceased were receiving a pension, upon death the pension would cease (unless the pension qualified as an auto-reversionary pension). If SMSF assets were then sold/transferred, the SMSF would have CGT implications.  (more…)

Last minute planning checklists for everyone from Small Business Owners to SMSF Trustees as well as Personal planning.


Have you left your financial planning until the last minute?  Go over this checklist with your accountant or financial planner as soon as possible.  Some of these strategies apply every year, while others are specific to this year because of the changes in the tax rate, the end to the flood levy, and some changes to small business write offs in the next year.

Checklists for:

Personal / Family

Small Business Owner:

SMSF Trustee

Investment Property Landlord

See full article: http://myob.com.au/blog/end-of-financial-year-planning-checklists/#ixzz1ysA6ExvQ

I hope this guidance  has been helpful and please take the time to comment. Feedback always appreciated.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AdvDipFS AMC

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

  Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin NextGen Wealth on Facebook SMSFCoach Blog

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 8853 6833,  Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

 

ABN 20 060 778 216 • AFSL No.232686

Liam Shorte is a partner in NextGen Wealth Solutions, Corporate Authorised Representative of Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited, Licence No 232686, Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited ABN 20 060 778 216.

Important information

The information in this article is provided for illustrative purposes only and does not take into consideration your personal circumstances. You are encouraged to seek financial advice suitable to your circumstances to avoid a decision that is not appropriate. Any reference to your actual circumstances is coincidental. Genesys and its representatives receive fees and brokerage from the provision of financial advice or placement of financial products.

Consider prepaying next years Private Health Insurance before June 30th – EOFY Money Saving TIP #1


As a result of the introduction of mean testing of the Private Health Insurance Premium Rebate wewant to alert you to a one-off savings possibility in relation to the private health insurance rebate.

If you pre-pay your 2012/13 private health insurance premium before 30 June 2012, you may still be able to access the Government rebate.

As you may be aware, the Government currently provides a non-means tested rebate for private health insurance premiums. The rebate can be claimed directly from the insurer, or as a tax offset when you lodge your income tax return. the majority of clients claim it upfront and if you don’t then you may need to consider doing so this year.

The rebate is currently 30% for those under 65 and rising  from 35% to 40% of the premium depending on the age of the policy holder.

The Government has now passed the required legislation that will apply an income test to the availability of the rebate to any premiums paid on or after 1 July 2012. The more income you earn, the lower the rebate as follows:

Private Health Insurance Incentive Tiers (2011-2012) with effect 1 July 2012

Singles

<$84,000 

$84,001-97,000

$97,001-130,000

>$130,001

Families

<$168,000

$168,001-194,000

$194,001-260,000

>$260,001

Rebate
< age 65 30% 20% 10% 0%
Age 65-69 35% 25% 15% 0%
Age 70+ 40% 30% 20% 0%
Medicare Levy Surcharge
All ages 0.0% 1.0% 1.25% 1.5%

Note: The thresholds increase annually, based on growth in Average Weekly Ordinary Time Earnings (AWOTE). Single parents and couples (including de facto couples) are subject to the family tiers. For families with children, the thresholds are increased by $1,500 for each child after the first.

Singles earning $84,000 or less and families earning $168,000 or less will continue to receive the existing 30, 35 and 40 per cent rebate, depending on their age.

Once your ‘adjusted’ income is greater than $130,000 (or $260,000 as a family), no rebate will be available.

For a family with gross premiums of say $2,500, this will result in an increase to the out of pocket premium costs of $750.00

The current rebate applies to a premium ‘paid’ during the income year. Accordingly, it follows that if you prepay your 2012-13 premium on or before 30 June 2012, the current rules should apply and the rebate should be available.

If you are interested in this one-off savings opportunity, we suggest you contact your private health insurer to discuss the possibility of pre-paying next year’s premium and ensure that their is no penalty for prepayment and that their system can cope with the prepayment.

Increase to Medicare Surcharge levy for High Income Earners

For those without Private Health Cover be aware that  the Medicare levy surcharge for people without private health insurance will lift to 1.5 per cent of taxable income for those top earners without private health insurance cover. (see table above)

I hope this guidance  has been helpful and please take the time to comment. Feedback always appreciated.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AdvDipFS AMC

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

      

NextGen Wealth Solutions

Tel: 02 8853 6833,  Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

 

ABN 20 060 778 216 • AFSL No.232686

Liam Shorte is a partner in NextGen Wealth Solutions, Corporate Authorised Representative of Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited, Licence No 232686, Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited ABN 20 060 778 216.

Important information

The information in this article is provided for illustrative purposes only and does not take into consideration your personal circumstances. You are encouraged to seek financial advice suitable to your circumstances to avoid a decision that is not appropriate. Any reference to your actual circumstances is coincidental. Genesys and its representatives receive fees and brokerage from the provision of financial advice or placement of financial products.

The added value of franking credits in a SMSF Portfolio


 One of the least understood and core benefits of SMSFs are the value of franking credits attached to many blue chip share dividends.  You can tilt your portfolio to enhance the taxation benefits to your fund.

Targeting of imputation credits received predominantly from direct share investment in Australian, and to a lesser extent through managed funds is not that difficult. Franking credits (properly known as Imputation credits) can also be used to offset the tax payable on the taxable income of the fund if still in accumulation stage or refunds can be received from the ATO if in pension phase (don’t you just love receiving money from the ATO!)

The key point to understand around franking credits is the fact that the income tax rate for super funds is only 15% in Accumulation phase and 0% in Pension phase, while imputation credits from fully franked dividends can be as high as 30% of the gross dividend of an Australian share. This means that the franking credit covers the tax payable on the dividend received, and leaves a significant excess to be used to reduce the other tax payable by the fund or to be claimed as a refund

So how does it work in reality ?

So company Widget Ltd makes $1.00 profit and therefore is required to pay company tax at the rate of 30% on this $1 profit. Consequently the taxed $0.30 (30% of $1) will be paid in cash to the tax office and the company then records this $0.30 into their franking account. The franking account is only a record of what was paid and does not contain actual money. The company’s ability to frank its dividend will depend on the balance of this franking account. If the franking credit contains a surplus, the company may declare a fully franked (100% franked) dividend. If the franking account isn’t large enough, perhaps because it pays tax overseas, then the company may declare a partially franked dividend. That is, the dividend received by the SMSF is “grossed up” by the amount of the imputation credit to achieve a grossed up dividend. It is on this amount that tax is then assessed at 15% or 05 depending on the phase of your SMSF. The fund is then entitled to a tax offset for the franking credit.

Example: a worked example below of a SMSF that only holds Telstra shares and ANZ shares:

Dividend Franking Credits Taxable Income Accumulation Phase Taxable Income Accumulation Phase
TLS Shares $1260 $540 $1,800 $1,800
ANZ Shares $840 $360 $1,200 $1,200
Total $2100 $900 $3,000 $3,000
Tax @ 15% $450
Tax @ 0% $0
Less: Franking credits $900 $900
Excess Franking credits $450 $900

In this example, not only will the fund pay no tax on the dividend income of these two shareholdings, but it will have:

  • Accumulation Phase $450 of excess franking credits
  • Pension Phase $900 of excess franking credits ;

Which the SMSF Trustees can use to offset against other tax liabilities of the fund (such as other income, capital gains, and taxable contributions) or if  none exists, then the SMSF fund can receive a refund of this amount. (Love it!)

The 45 day rule

As the examples have shown fully franked dividends and franking credits make investing in Australian shares a very tax effective strategy. However, the ATO realises this and to prevent investors from abusing the system (called dividend stripping) they introduced the 45 day rule. The 45 day rule states that shareholder must hold shares for 45 days (not counting days of purchase or sale) for any franking credits over $5,000.

Beware of blind dividend chasing , you can hit a wall!

A word of warning before you decide to put your life savings into chasing shares with the highest dividends. While some high yielding dividend stocks may look enticing it would be useless if those shares drop in value (falling capital value). Always research the company and look for strong fundamentals, for example what does the company’s dividend history look like? Are the dividends growing year on year in line with the earnings per share? Is there long term potential for this company? Will earnings rise in the near term and are they sustainable.

Want a Superannuation Review or are you just looking for an adviser that will keep you up to date and provide guidance and tips like in this blog? Then why now contact me at our Castle Hill or Windsor office in Northwest Sydney to arrange a one on one consultation. Just click the Schedule Now button up on the left to find the appointment options. Do it! make 2016 the year to get organised or it will be 2026 before you know it.

Please consider passing on this article to family or friends. Pay it forward!

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

Superannuation Guarantee Age Limit to be Abolished in 2013


This change last November has gone under the radar but its needs to be highlighted as it will be especially important to Self Managed Super Fund members who run their own businesses as it will enhance their ability to tax plan and continue contributing to Super tax effectively.

The Government has announced that the 70 year age limit for superannuation contributions required to be made by an employer under the Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Act, 1992 will be abolished.  Currently, employers are not required to make any SG contributions in respect of employees once they attain age 70.

The Government had originally aimed to increase the age limit to 75 but has subsequently decided to remove the age limit entirely.

This is a win for older working Australians with the House of Representatives passing amendments to the Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Amendment Bill 2011 that abolish the superannuation guarantee age limit.

From 1 July 2013, eligible employees aged 70 and over will receive the superannuation guarantee for the first time. This increases the coverage of the superannuation guarantee scheme to an additional 51,000 Australians aged 70 and over, who will get the benefit of the superannuation guarantee if they continue working.

“Making superannuation contributions compulsory for these mature-age employees will improve the adequacy and equity of the retirement income system, and provide an incentive to older Australians to remain in the workforce for longer,” Mr Shorten said.

A 1 July 2013 commencement date provides time for employers and older Australians to adjust to the new superannuation arrangements.

The changes will also ensure that employers will be able to claim income tax deductions for superannuation guarantee contributions made to employees aged 70 and over from 1 July 2013.

It ensures employers will not bear a higher cost in employing workers 70 and over compared with other workers.

Feedback always appreciated.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AdvDipFS AMC

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

       

NextGen Wealth Solutions

Tel: 02 8853 6833,  Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

 

ABN 20 060 778 216 • AFSL No.232686

Liam Shorte is a partner in NextGen Wealth Solutions, Corporate Authorised Representative of Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited, Licence No 232686, Genesys Wealth Advisers Limited ABN 20 060 778 216.

Important information

The information in this article is provided for illustrative purposes only and does not take into consideration your personal circumstances. You are encouraged to seek financial advice suitable to your circumstances to avoid a decision that is not appropriate. Any reference to your actual circumstances is coincidental. Genesys and its representatives receive fees and brokerage from the provision of financial advice or placement of financial products.

Superannuation Splitting to a Spouse already in or entering Transition to Retirement Phase


So I got a question about continuing to Super Split to a spouse who is over 55 and already using a Transition to retirement Pension but not fully retired.

If a client is over 55 with a TRIS/TTRAP Pension and an Accumulation Account as they are still working or not fully retired, can they continue to receive Super Splits from their spouse?

The answer is yes they can receive the splits into their accumulation account as they are between 55 and 64 and not retired which meets the eligibility rules. The ATO guidelines state:

“Which members are eligible to apply?
All your members are eligible, although it’s your decision whether to offer a splitting facility to all members. They can apply to split contributions regardless of their own age, but their spouse, to whom you transfer the contributions, must be either:

less than 55 years old
55 to 64 years old and not retired.”

The super contributions splitting provisions operate independently from the pension payment rules. So as long as each set of provisions are complied with, there shouldn’t be an issue.

The question was then asked “could the spouse then consolidate their TRIS/TTRAP and Accumulation accounts the following year and thereby moving those funds to pension phase and possibly accessing a higher maximum pension including the amount super split from their spouse.”

 I again believe yes as otherwise the accounting would have to quarantine Super Split amounts until 65 or retirement and the ATO have again said:

“There are no requirements for funds to specially report to us amounts that have been rolled over or received as a result of a contributions-splitting application”

 This clarifies the way to continue implementing two strategies:

  • When looking to maximise clients TRIS/TTRAP pensions – often to use the 10% to pay off debt
  • Ensuring a member can do rollbacks, consolidations and recommencements to maximise the amount in pension phase.

Make sure to get individual advice on your personal circumstances and be aware that the Super split amount will count towards the receiving spouse’s concession caps.

I hope this guidance  has been helpful and please take the time to comment. Feedback always appreciated. Click here to arrange a meeting/call back or contact our Castle Hill or Windsor offices for an appointment to discuss your needs.

Liam Shorte B.Bus SSA™ AFP

Financial Planner & SMSF Specialist Advisor™

SMSF Specialist Adviser Follow SMSFCoach on Twitter Liam Shorte on Linkedin SMSFCoach on Facebook Google+

Verante Financial Planning

Tel: 02 98941844, Mobile: 0413 936 299

PO Box 6002 BHBC, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

5/15 Terminus St. Castle Hill NSW 2154

Corporate Authorised Representative of Magnitude Group Pty Ltd ABN 54 086 266 202, AFSL 221557

This information has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs. This website provides an overview or summary only and it should not be considered a comprehensive statement on any matter or relied upon as such.

Important information

The information in this article is provided for illustrative purposes only and does not take into consideration your personal circumstances. You are encouraged to seek financial advice suitable to your circumstances to avoid a decision that is not appropriate. Any reference to your actual circumstances is coincidental. Genesys and its representatives receive fees and brokerage from the provision of financial advice or placement of financial products.

%d bloggers like this: